"We need US$177"

published 16-09-2014 15:30, last modified 18-09-2014 15:41
On September 17th, Cambodian garment workers in 139 factories in 52 areas took part in demonstrations calling for an increase in the minimum wage to US$177. 10,000 workers wore t-shirts with the US$177 demand printed on and 100,000 stickers were distributed across the countries capital, Phnom Penh. In solidarity activists from New Jersey to Melbourne via Geneva and Brussels, also took part in actions calling for an immediate increase in the minimum wage.
"We need US$177"

credit: Heather Stilwell

Brands continue to squeeze the already small profit margins. It is high time brands take their responsibility and tackle the issue which lies at the heart of our protests: a living wage. The wage hike to US$177 is one step into that direction.”

Ath Thorn, C.CAWDU

Since late 2013 Cambodian Workers have been demanding an increase in the minimum wage in order to take crucial steps towards the payment of a living wage. In early January wage struggles escalated when police and military cracked down on wage protests and 23 workers were arrested. CCC have been supporting the Cambodian workers in their struggle throughout the year you can read more here

The wage board in Cambodia is set to reconvene again in October. The Cambodian unions are joining together today to demand a raise in the minimum wage to US$177 with immediate effect.

On September 17 tens of thousands of workers across Cambodia took action, wearing t-shirts with the US$177 demand at their work benches and calling on key brands in Cambodia including H&M to take immediate action to commit to paying the US$177 and committing to stay in Cambodia before the Wage Board meets.

You can see photos of events as they happened here.

Filed under: ,
See also
New safety initiative launched in India today ignores vital lessons from the past New safety initiative launched in India today ignores vital lessons from the past

A building safety initiative launching in India today, aimed at improving safety for workers in the ...

Western European brands are profiting from poverty wages in Romania: Europe’s biggest fashion manufacturer. Western European brands are profiting from poverty wages in Romania: Europe’s biggest fashion manufacturer.

Garment workers in Romanian earn a mere 14 percent of a living wage. Therefore their family members ...

2017 Ukraine Factsheet

Factsheet, compiled in 2017

2017 Serbia Factsheet

Compiled in 2017

2017 Hungary Factsheet

Compiled in 2017

2016 Albania factsheet

2014 Moldova Factsheet

Factsheet explaining the Moldovan garment industry

2014 Macedonia Factsheet

Factsheet explaining the garment industry in Macedonia (FYROM)

2014 Georgia Factsheet

Factsheet explaining the situation of garment workers in Georgia.

2014 Croatia Factsheet

Factsheet explaining the situation facing garment workers in Croatia.

more ...